Affordable Azure DR for everyone

hybrid cloud and datacenter management

Disaster recovery is something we pray never to happen but unavoidable in certain situations. Every business organization regardless of their size need to plan for a disaster recovery plan to protect their key business assets. In this articles we’re look into how Azure Disaster Recovery (Cloud based DR) can be used to protect critical business applications systems.

With recent updates there are several methods we can use Azure Site Recovery (ASR) to protect our on premise systems,

1. On-premises Hyper-V site to Azure protection with Hyper-V replication — Orchestrate replication, failover, and recovery from an on-premises site with one or more Hyper-V servers but . Virtual machine data is replicated from a source Hyper-V host server to Azure.

2. On-premises VMM site to on-premises VMM site protection with Hyper-V replication — Orchestrate replication, failover, and recovery between on-premises VMM sites. Virtual machine data is replicated from a source Hyper-V host…

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Error ID 70094: ASR Protection cannot be enable for HYPER-V VM

hybrid cloud and datacenter management

I came across above error when tried to setup ASR using new portal. Every step went find until I get below error,

image

clearly this highlight I cannot replicate the VM successfully to the Azure Recovery Vault. I’ve tried re-registering the Azure Site Recovery agent on the HYPER-V host as well. Though HYPER-V host register properly on the Recovery Vault VM protection fails with above error. On the hyper-v console I can see VM replication is on error state.

So finally meddle around the host logs I found out ASR has been setup previously and has not been removed properly. This means each VM replication also not completed and hanging around on error state. Only way to proceed is to clear those unsuccessful replication data on the host side targeting individual VM’s which is effected.

You need to run below mention PS command on each host targeting the effected VMs,

PS:…

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Azure Site Recovery–Story revamped using new portal

hybrid cloud and datacenter management

In this blog post I’ll guide how to setup Azure Site Recovery (ASR) on the new portal using ARM model. If you’re not familiar with the ASR concept you can refer here. Compared to setting up ASR on old Azure portal, Microsoft ASR team carried out significant enhancement on the new portal and make it very much UI friendly.

In this blog post I’ll explain how to protect HYPER-V VM’s. You can protect VM’s hosted on single HYPER-V (Stand alone) or HYPER-V cluster (without VMM) using these steps. Few things I won’t cover in this blog post are how to create resource group, Virtual network….etc. I’ll provide relevant links for that for you to get in depth idea.

1. Wow to create a resource group in Azure – https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/azure-resource-manager/resource-group-overview

2. How to setup networking for ASR – https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/blog/networking-infrastructure-setup-for-microsoft-azure-as-a-disaster-recovery-site/

So with the assumption you have HYPER-V server with bunch of…

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Azure – How to trigger Azure runbooks with Azure Monitor

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Explore Azure and Powershell

Today we shall see how to trigger runbooks using webhooks when an alert is fired from Azure Monitor.

To illustrate this, I have taken a specific example of triggering a runbook, when an Azure virtual machine is de-allocated.

Step 1: Simulate a de-allocation event by Stopping a virtual machine.

Step 2: Check the activity logs for the de-allocation event.

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Step 3: Click on the “+ Add activity log alert”. This will start up a pane to fill out the alert details.

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Step 4: Before filling out the alert details, I encourage you to go ahead and create an empty Runbook. So that you can create the webhook for the Runbook, which is required while filling out the alert details.

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Step 5: Once you click on the “Webhook”, you will get the below pane. Click on “Create new webhook” and fill out the details accordingly. Make sure you copy the URL…

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Monitoring Domain Controllers in SCOM 2016 – Event ID 1102

SCOM & Other Geeky Stuff

So  you deploy a SCOM2016 agent to a Windows 2016 Domain Controller, only problem is, after the agent push, discovery doesn’t work. Well, the agent isn’t corrupted… Ports are open… SCOM agent is being deployed using the System Local account…  etc. etc. So, now what?

Taking a look at the Windows 2016 domain controller and its event log, the domain controller OpsMgr log is getting bombarded with Event IDs 1102….

After some investigation, seems to be this has been an issue in SCOM 2012 (and 2012R2) as well. Well, here’s the fix…

Taking a look at the HSLockdown, the Local System account is being denied access..  Browse to the following folder “%windir%Program FilesMicrosoft Monitoring AgentAgent “and run the following command (elevated access…), “HSLockdown.exe /L

Now that we can see the Local System account is being denied access, let’s give it access… Running the…

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SCOM Servers not “Remotely Manageable”?

SCOM & Other Geeky Stuff

Odds are you probably will have some machines where you can’t deploy the SCOM agent via SCOM console, or PowerShell, or some automated way, and you must install and configure the agent manually. Days/weeks/years go by and now you need to decommission that troublesome, manually installed agents Primary Managed Server. You go to the console and right click, and notice you cannot change the machines primary management server.  Well that is because any manually installed agents SCOM/SQL disables this feature. Well, there is a workaround!

Launch SQL and run the following query against the OperationsManager database to get a list of all manually installed servers:

select bme.DisplayName from MT_HealthService mths
INNER JOIN BaseManagedEntity bme on bme.BaseManagedEntityId = mths.BaseManagedEntityId
where IsManuallyInstalled = 1

Now that you have determined which servers were manually installed, to re-enable the remotely manageable feature, run the following SQL query (against the OpsMgr DB).

UPDATE MT_HealthService
SET IsManuallyInstalled=0

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Enabling SCOM 2012R2 Agent Proxy

SCOM & Other Geeky Stuff

The other day, I’m asked, “what the heck are these SCOM agent proxy alerts!?” I’m sure you fellow SCOM admins have seen these alerts before:

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You could go to the computer that SCOM is complaining about and manually enable the agent proxy via Administration > Managed Computers, and modifying its properties, see below:

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Or…… you could make your life easier, and do this…

The fix is easy, and the explanation are both below:

To resolve the “Agent proxy not enabled” alert for all machines in your current environment, run the following PowerShell code in the SCOM PowerShell Console:

get-SCOMagent | where {$_.ProxyingEnabled -match "False"} | Enable-SCOMAgentProxy

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To prevent this alert in the future, run the following below:

add-pssnapin "Microsoft.EnterpriseManagement.OperationsManager.Client";
new-managementGroupConnection -ConnectionString:yourSCOMserverFQDNhere;
set-location "OperationsManagerMonitoring::";
Set-DefaultSetting -Name HealthServiceProxyingEnabled -Value True

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